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Summer

Summer

Wait no more.

 

We’ve been waiting for summer all summer long.  Waiting for a quiet moment out on the balcony, the scent of barbecue wafting through the air. Waiting to get in the car and just drive with nothing but a tent, a sleeping bag and the desire for an adventure to guide us. Waiting to climb, run or bike up a mountain. Waiting to cast our rod. Waiting to spend time with nature.

The wait is over, summer is here. Just make sure you keep warm. 

66°North

We’ve been waiting for summer all summer long. Waiting for a quiet moment out on the balcony, the scent of barbecue wafting through the air. Waiting to get in the car and just drive with nothing but a tent, a sleeping bag and the desire for an adventure to guide us. Waiting to climb, run or bike up a mountain. Waiting to cast our rod. Waiting to spend time with nature.

The wait is over, summer is here. Just make sure you keep warm.

66°North

  


Don't like sitting
in an office

 

Climbing Iceland’s highest peak
is just another day in the office

for Einar Rúnar Sigurðsson.

Don't like sitting
in an office

 

Climbing Iceland’s highest peak
is just another day in the office
for Einar Rúnar Sigurðsson.

   

  

  

 

Every autumn, mountain guide Einar scours Vatnajökull glacier, hunting for safe ice-caves to visit. Saying he searches for them is better English, but we prefer hunt because that makes Einar a cave-hunter. Now, who doesn't want a title like that on their business card?

“It wasn’t my plan to become a guide. I was always going to be a photographer. At first I only took professional photographers up on the glacier. Now people just bring their iPhone and a selfie stick, and I’m like: ‘You’re going into an ice cave and not even bringing a tripod!?’”

“I discovered about 20 of the 25 known ice caves this season. I named most of the caves something like Crystal Ice Cave and Treasure Island Ice Cave. You can’t be sure that the conditions allow for them to form every year.  The glacier is receding fast even though the water underneath them runs the same. I’ve been taking photos since 1994 and looking back on those shots you can see that the glacier has receded a full kilometer and in places it’s 80 meters thinner.”

“Oddly enough, we don’t have a lot of ghost stories around here. But I remember, when I was a little boy, they would play Westerns and stuff on TV. And I would look towards the mountains out the window of the farm and imagine that past the edge of the glacier there was a vast plain filled with cowboys and Indians.”

“I do this work because I love being outdoors. I don’t want to be stuck in an office. Life to me is about having just enough and keep a home. I don’t want anything else.  I could have more money by working more but I don't want to spend my life in that way.   My objective is to enjoy every day. Otherwise it’s not worth it to me.”

  

  

Every autumn, mountain guide Einar scours Vatnajökull glacier, hunting for safe ice-caves to visit. Saying he searches for them is better English, but we prefer hunt because that makes Einar a cave-hunter. Now, who doesn't want a title like that on their business card?

“It wasn’t my plan to become a guide. I was always going to be a photographer. At first I only took professional photographers up on the glacier. Now people just bring their iPhone and a selfie stick, and I’m like: ‘You’re going into an ice cave and not even bringing a tripod!?’”

“I discovered about 20 of the 25 known ice caves this season. I named most of the caves something like Crystal Ice Cave and Treasure Island Ice Cave. You can’t be sure that the conditions allow for them to form every year.  The glacier is receding fast even though the water underneath them runs the same. I’ve been taking photos since 1994 and looking back on those shots you can see that the glacier has receded a full kilometer and in places it’s 80 meters thinner.”

 

“Oddly enough, we don’t have a lot of ghost stories around here. But I remember, when I was a little boy, they would play Westerns and stuff on TV. And I would look towards the mountains out the window of the farm and imagine that past the edge of the glacier there was a vast plain filled with cowboys and Indians.”

“I do this work because I love being outdoors. I don’t want to be stuck in an office. Life to me is about having just enough and keep a home. I don’t want anything else.  I could have more money by working more but I don't want to spend my life in that way.   My objective is to enjoy every day. Otherwise it’s not worth it to me.” 

 

 

 

Extreme sports
are meditation

 

Heiðar Logi Elíasson finds peace
among the waves.

Extreme sports
are meditation  

 

Heiðar Logi Elíasson finds peace
among the waves.

 

Surfer Heiðar Logi traded alcohol for adrenaline when he was eighteen years old. There’s not much left of the old troublemaker - he’s currently in Bali acting as a tour guide for a group of pharmacologists and doctors to-be. The students party every night but that’s when Heiðar ‘mainly just eats’.

“I always dreamed of becoming a sports professional - snowboarding or surfing, but there were so many things stopping me. I was working full-time and would come home tired like a dog. It’s hard to do much more than that. So a few years ago, I made a decision. I decided to focus only on what I loved doing and wanted to keep doing. It took a lot of work and a lot of time and it was pretty scary at first, but now I’m in a place where I can pretty much make everything I want to happen happen.”

“My life is pretty fast-paced now. There’s a lot of stuff going on, a lot of different projects, and many things I want to do. But when I practice yoga it’s all there is. My mind slows down and I enjoy spending time with myself. I thought it was pretty weird to begin with, but soon realized that it worked for me. You orientate your mind either in one specific direction or you try to empty it completely. You’re not wondering what to cook for dinner or when you’re going to wash your clothes. When you’re doing extreme sports, whether it’s surfing or off-road motorcycling, you have to focus 100% on what you’re doing because otherwise it’s very dangerous. So you’re pointing your mind in one direction. In a sense, extreme sports are a form of meditation because they unclutter your mind. The peace and calm that come with such focus are what makes people want to do extreme sports.”

  

    

  

Surfer Heiðar Logi traded alcohol for adrenaline when he was eighteen years old. There’s not much left of the old troublemaker - he’s currently in Bali acting as a tour guide for a group of pharmacologists and doctors to-be. The students party every night but that’s when Heiðar ‘mainly just eats’.

“I always dreamed of becoming a sports professional - snowboarding or surfing, but there were so many things stopping me. I was working full-time and would come home tired like a dog. It’s hard to do much more than that. So a few years ago, I made a decision. I decided to focus only on what I loved doing and wanted to keep doing. It took a lot of work and a lot of time and it was pretty scary at first, but now I’m in a place where I can pretty much make everything I want to happen happen.”

“My life is pretty fast-paced now. There’s a lot of stuff going on, a lot of different projects, and many things I want to do. But when I practice yoga it’s all there is. My mind slows down and I enjoy spending time with myself. I thought it was pretty weird to begin with, but soon realized that it worked for me. You orientate your mind either in one specific direction or you try to empty it completely. You’re not wondering what to cook for dinner or when you’re going to wash your clothes. When you’re doing extreme sports, whether it’s surfing or off-road motorcycling, you have to focus 100% on what you’re doing because otherwise it’s very dangerous. So you’re pointing your mind in one direction. In a sense, extreme sports are a form of meditation because they unclutter your mind. The peace and calm that come with such focus are what makes people want to do extreme sports.” 

  

   

Me, the rod
& a few sheep.

 

Fishing is inextricably bound up with
existence for Valgerður Árnadóttir.

Me, the rod
& a few sheep.



Fishing is inextricably bound up with
existence for Valgerður Árnadóttir.

  

  

   

Fly-fishing is in Vala’s blood: as a child she would knock on her neighbour’s door to trade the fish she’d caught for a piece of chocolate. She’s convinced that photographs of her eight month-old self, tied to her father while he stands by the river, angling, wouldn’t be a hit with contemporary Child Protective Services.

“When I was a kid, maybe 4 or 5 years old, my dad would give me a worm and ask me to hold on to it. Throughout the day I’d ask ‘dad, are you going to use my worm now?’ right up until the last cast of the day. Then he’d ask me for the worm, all squishy and soft from hours spent in my palm. That’s how he kept me calm and happy and excited for the whole day.”

“I started fishing very young so it wasn’t until I became a self- conscious teenager that I realized that I was practically the only girl doing it. And I think the guys I fish with tend to forget too. At least they don’t hesitate to pass wind in the car while we’re driving to the river. But it’s all changing; I know there
are more women out there fishing with a rod and I regularly receive e-mails from girls who are interested but don’t know where to start.”

“For me, fishing is inextricably bound up with existence. As soon as summer rolls around I start wondering where to find the salmon. My head is usually all over the place but when it comes to fishing I can focus on what I’m doing. It’s lovely just to be in nature, disconnected from the world and I don’t mind being by myself. I think fishing is the only thing I could do alone. Just the rod and I and maybe a couple of sheep. You become really small when confronted with the magnificence of nature.”

  

Fly-fishing is in Vala’s blood: as a child she would knock on her neighbour’s door to trade the fish she’d caught for a piece of chocolate. She’s convinced that photographs of her eight month-old self, tied to her father while he stands by the river, angling, wouldn’t be a hit with contemporary Child Protective Services.

“When I was a kid, maybe 4 or 5 years old, my dad would give me a worm and ask me to hold on to it. Throughout the day I’d ask ‘dad, are you going to use my worm now?’ right up until the last cast of the day. Then he’d ask me for the worm, all squishy and soft from hours spent in my palm. That’s how he kept me calm and happy and excited for the whole day.”

 

“I started fishing very young so it wasn’t until I became a self- conscious teenager that I realized that I was practically the only girl doing it. And I think the guys I fish with tend to forget too. At least they don’t hesitate to pass wind in the car while we’re driving to the river. But it’s all changing; I know there 
are more women out there fishing with a rod and I regularly receive e-mails from girls who are interested but don’t know where to start.”

“For me, fishing is inextricably bound up with existence. As soon as summer rolls around I start wondering where to find the salmon. My head is usually all over the place but when it comes to fishing I can focus on what I’m doing. It’s lovely just to be in nature, disconnected from the world and I don’t mind being by myself. I think fishing is the only thing I could do alone. Just the rod and I and maybe a couple of sheep. You become really small when confronted with the magnificence of nature.” 

 

 

Iceland is one
big playground.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A slightly overcast sky with a slow
breeze is the perfect day for
Emil Þór Guðmundsson.

Iceland is one 
big playground.

 

A slightly overcast sky with a slow breeze is the perfect day forEmil Þór Guðmundsson.

  

Cyclist Emil never learned to catch a ball because he was too busy biking across town. He says biking isn’t that different from hiking and that anyone who can walk up and down a mountain can do the same on a bicycle - only biking is way more fun.

“I founded [local bike store] Kría to create more bike-nerds in Iceland. It’s a very nerdy sport. But aren’t they all? I just know that you can turn pretty weird if you really dive in. I’ve definitely heard of marriages that came apart because one party wasn’t willing to give up any time dedicated to bicycle stuff.”

“We live in a country which is basically a huge playground. A real pearl. I’ve been biking here and there and am constantly looking for new challenges but I prefer Iceland. The landscapes are so different. You can find all the same stuff in America but they’re so far apart. Here, you can bike for three hours and see geysers and glaciers and whatnot, and the trails are way more accessible too. Of course I have a few secret spots but I’m not spilling the beans now! The land is delicate, too, and susceptible to damage if mistreated. It’s very important to stay on trails and be respectful of the environment and your fellow travellers.”

“It comes and goes for me. There are so many types of biking. I’ve had my BMX period, my mountain bike period, street racing period... It’s sort of like music: when you’re a teenager you might listen constantly to some sloppy punk band before you realize it may not be the best fit for a dinner party. And that’s when you start exploring new stuff.”

  

Cyclist Emil never learned to catch a ball because he was too busy biking across town. He says biking isn’t that different from hiking and that anyone who can walk up and down a mountain can do the same on a bicycle - only biking is way more fun.

“I founded [local bike store] Kría to create more bike-nerds in Iceland. It’s a very nerdy sport. But aren’t they all? I just know that you can turn pretty weird if you really dive in. I’ve definitely heard of marriages that came apart because one party wasn’t willing to give up any time dedicated to bicycle stuff.”

 

“We live in a country which is basically a huge playground. A real pearl. I’ve been biking here and there and am constantly looking for new challenges but I prefer Iceland. The landscapes are so different. You can find all the same stuff in America but they’re so far apart. Here, you can bike for three hours and see geysers and glaciers and whatnot, and the trails are way more accessible too. Of course I have a few secret spots but I’m not spilling the beans now! The land is delicate, too, and susceptible to damage if mistreated. It’s very important to stay on trails and be respectful of the environment and your fellow travellers.”

“It comes and goes for me. There are so many types of biking. I’ve had my BMX period, my mountain bike period, street racing period... It’s sort of like music: when you’re a teenager you might listen constantly to some sloppy punk band before you realize it may not be the best fit for a dinner party. And that’s when you start exploring new stuff.” 

Atli

€ 50,00

 

 

 

No distance
is too far.

 

Anything is possible if you just prepare
properly, says Elísabet Margeirsdóttir

No distance
is too far.

 

Anything is possible if you just prepare properly, says Elísabet Margeirsdóttir

  

   

 

Mountaineer Elísabet claims to do well in trail runs because she’s been doing them for a while. Her body is used to the scuffle by now, she says, and experience is the single most important thing when it comes to competing. She ran local trail Laugavegur in 2009 but ‘made the leap’ when she signed up for a 100 km run two years later.

“If you’re into trail runs they end up sort of taking over your life. There’s a certain lifestyle that comes with constant training and keeping in shape. Thankfully, you also do other stuff, but training forms the basis. People who know me just know that they can’t reach me before noon on a weekend.”

“After a certain period you attain a sort of high when you’re just driven by adrenaline. You zone out completely. You’re running along the most beautiful trails in the world and enjoying every minute of it. But if your feet get extremely tired and your muscles are screaming and your stomach is upside- down, you’re just dealing with that the whole time. There are people who run and suffer the whole time, people who overreach their boundaries. I prefer to train well so I can finish each run with dignity.”

“The mental side can also be coached. Often training is actually harder than competing because of the anxiety. You’re maybe in the middle of a five-hour session, running the same trail for the tenth time and your mind starts racing: ‘Why am I doing this? I want to stop now. I’m never doing this again!’ But on the day of the competition it doesn’t matter if you’re in for a 5 or 100-hour race. You won’t be bored unless you didn’t train well enough or if your mentality is wrong. If you’re not running for yourself, maybe, or just to cross it off of your bucket list.”

  

  

Mountaineer Elísabet claims to do well in trail runs because she’s been doing them for a while. Her body is used to the scuffle by now, she says, and experience is the single most important thing when it comes to competing. She ran local trail Laugavegur in 2009 but ‘made the leap’ when she signed up for a 100 km run two years later.

“If you’re into trail runs they end up sort of taking over your life. There’s a certain lifestyle that comes with constant training and keeping in shape. Thankfully, you also do other stuff, but training forms the basis. People who know me just know that they can’t reach me before noon on a weekend."

“After a certain period you attain a sort of high when you’re just driven by adrenaline. You zone out completely. You’re running along the most beautiful trails in the world and enjoying every minute of it. But if your feet get extremely tired and your muscles are screaming and your stomach is upside- down, you’re just dealing with that the whole time. There are people who run and suffer the whole time, people who overreach their boundaries. I prefer to train well so I can finish each run with dignity.”

“The mental side can also be coached. Often training is actually harder than competing because of the anxiety. You’re maybe in the middle of a five-hour session, running the same trail for the tenth time and your mind starts racing: ‘Why am I doing this? I want to stop now. I’m never doing this again!’ But on the day of the competition it doesn’t matter if you’re in for a 5 or 100-hour race. You won’t be bored unless you didn’t train well enough or if your mentality is wrong. If you’re not running for yourself, maybe, or just to cross it off of your bucket list.” 

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